Wynn & Coolidge Archive

Journal Articles 2010 to Present

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2016). An introduction to cognitive archaeology. Current Directions in Psychological Sciences, 25, 386-392.

Coolidge, F. L., Haidle, M., Lombard, M., & Wynn T. (2016). Bridging theory and bow hunting: Human cognitive evolution and archaeology. Antiquity, 90, 219-228.

DeLouize, A., Coolidge, F. L., & Wynn, T. (2016). Dopaminergic systems expansion and the advent of Homo erectus. Quaternary International, 427, 245-252.

Wynn, T. (2016). Review of settlement, society, and cognition: Landscapes in mind. European Journal of Archaeology, 19, 368-372.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2016). Archaeological insights into hominin cognitive evolution. Evolutionary Anthropology, 25, 200-201.

Wynn, T., Overmann, K. A., & Coolidge, F. L. (2016). The false dichotomy: A refutation of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim. Journal of Anthropological Sciences, 94, 1-22.

Coolidge, F. L. (2015). Numerosity structures lexical and grammatical number: Overmann’s definitive argument against Hurford’s “Without Language, No Numbers” hypothesis. Current Anthropology, 56, 646-647.

Coolidge, F. L., Overmann, K. A., & Wynn, T. (2015). Recursion: How did it evolve? Atlas of Science.

Wynn, T. (2015). Review of “Lucy to Language: The landmark papers”. Archaeology Journal, 172, 449-501.

Coolidge, F. L. (2014). The exaptation of the parietal lobes in Homo sapiens. Journal of Anthropological Sciences, 92, 295-298.

Wynn, T. (2014). Commentary on “Extended mind and visuo-spatial integration: Three hands for the Neandertal lineage.” Journal of Anthropological Sciences, 92, 291-293.

Wynn, T. (2014). The cognitive life of things. Review of “How things shape the mind: A theory of material engagement”. Current Anthropology, 55, 491-492.

Wynn, T.  & Coolidge, F. L. (2014). Technical cognition, working memory, and creativity. Pragmatics and Cognition, 22, 45-63.

Overmann, K. A. & Coolidge, F L. (2013). Human species and mating systems: Neandertal–Homo sapiens reproductive isolation and the archaeological and fossil records. Journal of Anthropological Sciences, 91, 1-20.

Overmann, K. A. & Coolidge, F. L. (2013). On the nature of numerosity and the role of language in developing number concepts: A reply to Everett. Current Anthropology, 54, 83-84.

Wynn, T. (2013). Review of “Casting the Net Wide: Papers in honor of Glynn Isaac and his approach to human origins research”. Azania, 48, 326-328.

Wynn, T. (2013). Review of “Landscape of the Mind: Human evolution and the archaeology of thought.” Quarterly Review of Biology, 88, 243.

Wynn, T. (2013). Review of “Replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans: Testing evolutionary models of learning.” Journal of Anthropological Research, 69, 439-441.

Wynn, T., Coolidge, F. L., Overmann, K. A., & Bright, M. (2013). The lion man and the evolution of the human mind. In Ulmer Museum (Ed.),  The return of the lion man: History, myth, magic. Verlagsgruppe Patmos.

Coolidge, F. L. (2012). On the emergence of grammatical language as a means of bypassing the limitations of working memory capacity. Physics of Life Reviews, 9, 217-218.

Coolidge, F. L. & Overmann, K. A. (2012). Numerosity, abstraction, and the evolution of symbolic thinking. Current Anthropology, 53, 204-225.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2012). The inner Neandertal. New Scientist, 2847, 26-27.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2012). What were Neandertals like? Muse (a science magazine for adolescents), 16, 30-35.

Wynn, T., Hernandez-Aguilar, A., Marchant, L., & McGrew, W. C. (2011). An ape’s view of the Oldowan revisited. Evolutionary Anthropology, 20, 181-197.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2011). Comment on “The Still Bay and Howiesons Poort, 77-59 ka: Symbolic material culture and the evolution of the mind during the African Middle Stone Age.” Current Anthropology, 52, 380-382.

Overmann, K. A., Coolidge, F. L., & Wynn, T. (2011). The prehistory of number concept. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 34, 142-144.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2011). The implications of the working memory model for the evolution of modern cognition. International Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 2011, 1-12.

Coolidge, F. L., Overmann, K. A., & Wynn, T. (2010). Recursion: What is it? Who has it? How did it evolve? WIREs Cognitive Science, 2, 547-554.

Journal Articles 2000-2009

Wynn, R. & Coolidge, F. L. (2009). Does greater phonological storage capacity correlate with levels of intentionality and Theory of Mind? Psychological Reports, 105, 625-632.

Wynn, T., Coolidge, F. L., & Bright, M. (2009). Hohlenstein-Stadel and the evolution of human conceptual thought. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 19, 73-83.

Wynn, T (2009). Hafted spears and the archeology of cognition. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106, 9544-9545.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2008). Stone-age meeting of minds. American Scientist, 96, 44-51.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2008). Why not cognition? Comment on “What’s a mother to do: The division of labor among Neandertals and modern humans in Eurasia”. Current Anthropology, 49, 895-897.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2008). The role of episodic memory and autonoetic thought in Upper Palaeolithic life. PaleoAnthropology, 2008, 212-217.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2007). The working memory account of the Neandertal cognition:  How phonological storage capacity may be related to recursion and the pragmatics of speech.  Journal of Human Evolution, 52, 707-710.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2006). The effects of the tree-to-ground sleep transition in the evolution of cognition in early Homo. Before Farming 2006:4 [online versions] article 11.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2006). The role of enhanced working memory in the production of therianthropic art. Rock Art Research, 23, 18-21.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2006). The effect of enhanced working memory on language. Journal of Human Evolution, 50, 230-231.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2005). Working memory, its executive functions, and the emergence of modern thinking. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 15, 5-26.

Arbogast, W.,  Church, M., & Wynn, T. (2005). Report of significant investigations, 1992-2001, Anthropology Department, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Colorado Archaeology, 1, 71-78.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2004). A cognitive and neuropsychological perspective on the Chatelperronian. Journal of Anthropological Research, 60, 55-73.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2004). The expert Neandertal mind. Journal of Human Evolution, 46, 467-487.

Wynn, T, & Coolidge, F. L. (2003). The role of working memory in the evolution of managed foraging. Before Farming, 2, 1-16.

Wynn, T. (2002). Archaeology and cognitive evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 389-438.

Wynn, T. (2002) The devil in the details. Reply to commentaries. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 426-432.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2001). Executive functions of the frontal lobes and the evolutionary ascendancy of Homo sapiens. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 11, 255-260.

Journal Articles 1990-1999

Wynn, T. (1998). Did Homo erectus speak? Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 8, 78-81.

Dwelis, S., Wynn, T., & Kraus, M. (1996). Preliminary report on Davis Rockshelter (5EP986). Southwestern Lore, 62, 1-19.

Wynn, T., Tierson, F., & Palmer, C. (1996). Evolution of sex differences in spatial cognition. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, 39, 11-42.

Wynn, T. (1995). Handaxe enigmas. World Archaeology, 27, 10-24.

Wynn, T. (1993). Two developments in the mind of early Homo, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 12, 299-322.

Wynn, T., Huber, T., McDonald, R., & Cummings, L. S. (1993). Late Holocene climate history in eastern El Paso County, Colorado. Southwestern Lore, 59,  6-15.

Wynn, T. (1991). Tools, grammar, and the archaeology of cognition. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 1, 191-206.

Wynn, T. & Tierson, F. (1990). Regional comparison of the shapes of later Acheulean handaxes. American Anthropologist, 92, 73-84.

Journal Articles 1980-1989

Wynn, T. & McGrew, W. C. (1989). An ape’s view of the Oldowan. Man, 24, 383-398.

Wynn, T. (1985). Piaget, stone tools, and the evolution of human intelligence. World Archaeology, 17, 32-43.

Wynn, T., McDonald, R., & Huber, T. (1985). Early Woodland occupation at Jackson Creek.  Southwestern  Lore, 51, 3-13.

McBrearty, S., Waane, S.A.C., & Wynn, T. (1984). The archaeology of Mbeya Region, southwestern Tanzania: Survey results. Azania, 19, 128-132.

Wynn, T. & Chadderdon, T. (1982). The Kiwira industry and the later stone age of the Nyakyusa Basin. Azania, 17, 127-143.

Wynn, T. (1981). The intelligence of Oldowan hominids. Journal of Human Evolution, 10, 529-541.

Journal Articles 1970-1979

Wynn, T. (1979). The intelligence of later Acheulean hominids. Man, 14, 371-391.

Sprague, C. & Wynn, T. (1974). A framework for the study of prehistoric population variation in sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of the Steward Anthropological Society, 5, 1-27.

Book Chapters

Wynn, T. (2017). Evolutionary Cognitive Archaeology. In T. Wynn & F. L. Coolidge (Eds.), Cognitive models in palaeolithic archaeology (1-20). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T., Haidle, M.,  Lombard, M., & Coolidge, F. L. (2017). The expert cognition model in human evolutionary studies. In T. Wynn & F. L. Coolidge (Eds.), Cognitive models in palaeolithic archaeology (21-43). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T., Overmann,K. A., Coolidge, F. L., & Janulis, K. (2017). Bootstrapping ordinal thinking. In T. Wynn & F. L. Coolidge (Eds.), Cognitive models in palaeolithic archaeology (197-213). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. (2017). Epilogue: Models, puddings and the puzzle. In T. Wynn & F. L. Coolidge (Eds.), Cognitive models in palaeolithic archaeology (197-213). Oxford University Press.

Coolidge, F. L., Wynn, T., Overmann, K. A., & Hicks, J. M. (2015). Cognitive Archaeology and the Cognitive Sciences. In E. Bruner (Ed.), Human paleoneurology (177-208). Springer.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2013). The evolution of working memory. In H. Pashler (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of the mind (792-793). Sage Inc.

Wynn, T., Coolidge, F. L., & Overmann, K. A. (2013). The archaeology of number concept and its implications for the evolution of language. In R. Botha & M. Everaert (Eds.), The evolutionary emergence of human language: Evidence and inference (118-138). Oxford University Press.

Coolidge, F. L., Wynn, T., & Overmann, K. A. (2012). The evolution of working memory. In T. P. Alloway & R. G. Alloway (Eds.), Working memory: The connected intelligence (37-60). Sage, Inc.

Coolidge, F. L., & Wynn, T. (2012). Cognitive prerequisites for a language of diplomacy. In M. Tallerman & K. Gibson (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of language evolution (216-223). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. (2012). The Palaeolithic record. In M. Tallerman & K. Gibson (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of language evolution (282-294). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2010). How Levallois reduction is similar to, and not similar to playing chess. In I. Davidson & A. Nowell (Eds.), Stone tools and the evolution of human cognition (185-206). University of Colorado Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2010). Beyond symbolism and language. In T. Wynn &  F. L. Coolidge (Eds.), Working memory: Beyond language and symbolism (S5-S16). Current Anthropology International Symposia Supplement, University of Chicago Press.

Wynn, T. (2010). The evolution of human spatial cognition. In F. Dolins (Ed.), Spatial perception, spatial cognition (213-236). Cambridge University Press.

Wynn, T. (2009). Whither evolutionary cognitive archaeology? In S. de Beaune, F. L. Coolidge, &  T. Wynn (Eds.), Cognitive archaeology and human evolution (145-149). Cambridge University Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2009). Implications of a strict standard for recognizing modern cognition in prehistory. In S. de Beaune, F. L. Coolidge, &  T. Wynn (Eds.), Cognitive archaeology and human evolution (145-149). Cambridge University Press.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2009). Recursion, phonological storage capacity, and the evolution of modern speech. In R. Botha & C. Knight (Eds.), The prehistory of language (244-254). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2007). Did a small but significant change in the capacity of working memory power the evolution of modern thinking? In O. Bar-Yosef, H. Hublin, & C. Renfrew (Eds.), Rethinking the human revolution: New behavioral & biological perspectives on the origins and dispersal of modern humans (79-90). Cambridge University Press.

Wynn, T. (2004). Evolutionary developments in the cognition of symmetry. In D. Washburn (Ed.), Embedded symmetries: Natural and cultural (27-46). University of New Mexico Press.

Wynn, T. (2001). The role of archaeology in cognitive science. In A. Nowell (Ed.), In the mind’s eye: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the evolution of the human mind (9-19). International Monographs in Prehistory.

Wynn, T. (2000). Symmetry and the evolution of the modular linguistic mind. In P. Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (Eds.), Evolution and the human mind (113-139). Cambridge University Press.

Wynn, T. (1996). The evolution of tools and symbolic behaviour. In A. Lock & C. Peters (Eds.), Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution (263-287). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. (1995). What artifacts reveal about the mind of Homo erectus. In J. R. F. Bower & S. Sartono (Eds.), Evolution and ecology of Homo erectus (263-274). Pithecanthropus Centennial Foundation, Leiden.

Wynn, T. (1994). Tools and tool making. In T. Ingold (Ed.), Culture, humanity, and social life (133-161). Routledge.

Wynn, T. (1993). Layers of thinking in tool behavior. In T. Ingold & K. Gibson (Eds.), Tools, Language and Cognition in Human Evolution (389-406). Cambridge University Press.

Wynn, T. (1991). Archaeological evidence for modern intelligence. In R. A. Foley (Ed.), The origins of human behaviour (52-66). Unwin Hyman.

Wynn, T. (1990). Natural history and the superorganic in the study of tool behavior. In M. Bekoff & D. Jamieson (Eds.), Interpretation and explanation in the study of behavior: Comparative perspectives (98-117). Westview Press.

Wynn, T. (1988). Tools and the evolution of human intelligence. In R. Byrne & A. Whiten (Eds.), Machiavellian intelligence: Social expertise and the evolution of intellect in monkeys, apes, and humans (271-284). Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. (1986). Archaeological evidence for the evolution of modern human intelligence. In M. Day & R. Foley (Eds.), The Pleistocene perspective, Vol. 1, Proceedings of the World Archaeological Congress. Allen & Unwin.

Authored Books

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (in press). The rise of Homo sapiens: The evolution of modern thinking revised edition. Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2013). Denken wie ein Neandertaler. Trans. C. Hartz. Verlag Philipp von Zabern.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2012). How to think like a neandertal. Oxford University Press.

Coolidge, F. L. & Wynn, T. (2009). The rise of Homo sapiens: The evolution of modern thinking. Wiley-Blackwell.

Wynn, T. (1989). The evolution of spatial competence. University of Illinois Press.

Edited Volumes

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2017). Cognitive models in paleolithic archaeology. Oxford University Press.

Wynn, T. & Coolidge, F. L. (2010). Working memory: Beyond language and symbolism. Current Anthropology International Symposia Supplement, Chicago University Press.

de Beaune, S., Coolidge, F. L., & Wynn, T. (2009). Cognitive archaeology and human evolution. Cambridge University Press.

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