THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF NUMBERS OFFERED ONLINE NOW AT THE CENTER FOR COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY @ UCCS

The Center for Cognitive Archaeology is pleased to announce a brand-new course, The Archaeology of Numbers!

Join Karenleigh A. Overmann for our online course in the Archaeology of Numbers. This course examines numbers as systems comprised of interacting psychological, behavioral, and material domains, using concepts and evidence from psychology and ethnography to interpret the archaeological record.  Course content includes the neuropsychology of numeracy, ethnographic behaviors with numbers, and ancient and modern numbers and counting devices. Classes begin January 19 and end May 15.

Visit us at the Center for Cognitive Archaeology for more information on classes. The deadline to register for courses is February 3, 2021. For information on registration, please visit: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/programs-a-l/cca

HISTORY OF COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY SINCE 1969 OFFERED ONLINE NOW AT THE CENTER FOR COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY @ UCCS

How did archaeologists come to apply cognitive models from psychology and philosophy of mind to the material record? Why were they drawn to begin investigating the evolution of the human mind? How has cognitive archaeology changed the way we think about the evolution of human intelligence and the structure and function of the mind? 

Join Karenleigh A. Overmann for the once-a-year offering of our course, The History of Cognitive Archaeology Since 1969. The course consists of a selection of primary sources that have been instrumental in establishing cognitive archaeology as a viable and influential approach in the study of human evolution. Readings are biased toward Anglophone archaeology and toward important issues in human cognitive evolution. Classes begin January 19 and end May 15. 

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Visit us at the Center of Cognitive Archaeology for more information on classes. The deadline to register for courses is February 3, 2021. For registration information, please visit: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/full_program_listings/cca

COGNITIVE EVOLUTION OFFERED ONLINE NOW AT THE CENTER FOR COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY @ UCCS

When, where, and how did the modern human mind evolve?

Join Professors Thomas Wynn and Frederick L. Coolidge for our online course in Cognitive Evolution. This course employs the theories and methods of several academic domains (cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, archaeology, linguistics, philosophy of mind, etc.) to interpret the tangible evidence for the evolution of mind—non-human primate anatomy and behavior, human neuroanatomy, hominin paleontology, and archaeology. Here, you will explore the origins and adaptive purposes of concept formation, spatial cognition, social cognition, language, symbolic structures, technology, and working memory on your way to a deeper understanding of the evolutionary changes in form and function of the mind. Classes begin January 19 and end May 15.

Visit us at the Center for Cognitive Archaeology for more information on classes. The deadline to register for courses is February 3, 2021. For information on registration, please visit: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/programs-a-l/cca

NEANDERTAL COGNITION OFFERED ONLINE NOW AT THE CENTER FOR COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY @ UCCS

How did Neandertals experience their world? How did their cognition and culture differ from ours? Were they pragmatic? Callous or cold-hearted? Did they love, were they charitable? Were they tough? Dogmatic? Xenophobic?

Join Professor Frederick L. Coolidge for our online course Neandertal Cognition. Together, we will explore the mind of some of our recent ancestors to compare and contrast similarities and differences between our behavior and the behavior of these archaic humans. After a century of suffering the negative biases of early scholars, Neandertals are emerging from the shadows of prehistory to take their rightful place as explorers and innovators who fought to survive in a heretofore uninhabitable clime. Our course reviews the archaeological evidence via empirical models of cognition in an effort to understand the cognitive and behavioral strategies employed by Homo neanderthalensis during their nearly half million years of existence. Classes begin January 19 and end May 15. 

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Visit us at the Center for Cognitive Archaeology for more information on classes. The deadline to register for courses is February 3, 2021. For registration information, please visit: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/programs-a-l/cca

NEUROCOGNITION OF ART NOW OFFERED ONLINE AT THE CENTER FOR COGNITIVE ARCHAEOLOGY @ UCCS

Interested in learning when, where, and how modern human aesthetics evolved?

Join Professor Manuel Martín-Loeches of the Complutense University of Madrid for our online course Neurocognition of Art. This course explores the biopsychological basis of human artistic behavior by investigating its neurocognitive and biological underpinnings. We expand our understanding of this otherwise bizarre activity in natural terms, thereby contextualizing art within the framework of Natural Selection. This approach provides a suitable foundation for exploring the possible evolutionary origins of art, its development, as well as its major milestones along human evolution. Although the course is mainly focused in visual art, much of its content can be applied to other forms of artistic behavior. Classes begin January 19 and end May 15.

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Visit us at the Center for Cognitive Archaeology for more information on classes. The deadline to register for courses is February 3, 2021. For registration information, visit: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/programs-a-l/cca

SPRING 2021 COURSES NOW AVAILABLE FOR REGISTRATION

The Center for Cognitive Archaeology at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs is now offering five courses for the Spring 2021 semester, including a brand new course, The Archaeology of Numbers. Spring 2021 semester starts January 19 through May 15. Graduate and undergraduate level training is offered in each class. For more information about the Center for Cognitive Archaeology and enrolling in courses, please visit us at: https://www.uccs.edu/lases/programs-a-l/cca

Deadline to register for course is February 3, 2021.

October’s Featured Book

This month’s featured book that the faculty of the Center for Cognitive Archaeology want to highlight is First Sculpture: Handaxe to Figure Stone by Tony Berlant and UCCS Distinguished Professor Thomas Wynn.

First Sculpture: Handaxe to Figure Stone, by Tony Berlant and Thomas Wynn, is the catalogue of the first museum exhibition to present ancient handaxes and figure stones as works of art. Traditionally understood as the longest-used tool in human history, with examples dating back more than 2 million years, some handaxes are equally fascinating for their non-utilitarian, aesthetic qualities. First Sculpture presents these objects as evidence of the earliest forms of artistic intention, highlighting the aesthetic qualities of each stone and providing crucial historical and scientific information to give the viewer a deeper understanding of human history, as well as an enriched appreciation for humankind’s early ability to sculpt beautiful objects.

The exhibition’s second focus, that of figure stones, suggests early human ability to recognize beauty and meaning in found objects. These naturally occurring stones possess evident shapes and patterns, including geometric forms, animals, and especially faces. Prehistoric people recognized these shapes and augmented their mimetic qualities through additional carving. First Sculpture: Handaxe to Figure Stone is the product of a unique collaboration between Los Angeles-based artist Tony Berlant and anthropologist Dr. Thomas Wynn, Distinguished Professor at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. The catalogue includes contributions by John Gowlett, Evan M. Maurer, Richard Deacon, Jared Diamond, Naama Goren-Inbar and V. S. Ramachandran. ©2018 Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX.

Oldest Human Footprints

Klint Janulis, UCCS alum and on the Center for Cognitive Archaeology board of directors, was recently on the team that uncovered Saudi footprints believed to be the oldest found on the Arabian peninsula.

Read their scientific journal article here: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/38/eaba8940

Other news stories about this discovery:
Yahoo News: https://news.yahoo.com/first-oldest-human-footprints-arabian-154800376.html
NBC News: https://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/it-s-first-oldest-human-footprints-arabian-peninsula-point-route-n1240429
The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/sep/17/seven-footprints-may-be-the-earliest-evidence-of-humans-on-the-arabian-peninsula
Sunday Times: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/world/120-000-year-old-footprints-lead-to-humans-grand-entrance-dk6n7969h

September’s Featured Book

This month’s featured book that the faculty of the Center for Cognitive Archaeology want to highlight is Evolutionary Neuropsychology: An Introduction to the Evolution of the Structures and Functions of the Human Brain, by UCCS Professor Frederick L. Coolidge.

In Evolutionary Neuropsychology, Coolidge examines the evolutionary origins of the human brain. A new multidisciplinary science, evolutionary neuropsychology assumes that brain regions developed their functions in response to environmental challenges over billions of years. These regions and neuronal circuitry now serve newer functions (exaptations) and are now involved in many higher cognitive functions.

Praise for Evolutionary Neuropsychology:

“Anyone curious about the evolutionary roots of the human brain will relish this book. It offers a spirited dive into modern brain function origins by tracing the earliest hominins’ cognition through current neuroscience. Coolidge has a knack for answering unforeseen questions. Readers will better understand neuropsychology through his overview of controversies, historical perspectives, and case histories. This text will begin new and exciting conversations.” – Michelle M. Merwin, Professor of Psychology, University of Tennessee Martin

“Coolidge delves deeply into the evolution of the brain and touches the physical stuff of the universe and the principles of life itself. In highly digestible prose, he offers an overview of evolutionary neuropsychology while challenging assumptions about learning, sleep, brain regions, and psychopathology…a must read.” – Karenleigh Overmann, Associate Professor of Anthropology (Adjunct), University of Colorado

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